About the church

Built: 1957
Architect: David Nye & Partners
Listing: not listed

The church forms one wing of a three sided, open ended courtyard. The opposite wing consists of a very handsome Edwardian Arts and Crafts style church hall, which was built in 1907. The two wings are linked by various administrative rooms and vestries.

It is built to a traditional design with modern materials. Externally it is clad in stock bricks but much of the structure and the roof has been executed in reinforced concrete. The multi-coloured stock bricks are laid in a flemish bond in solid construction. The window and door surrounds are decorated and emphasised by red chamfered brickwork which provide the jambs, sills and soffits. Modern metal windows of a Crittall type have been used throughout.

The nave is lit by tripartite pointed gothic arches with rubbed brick tracery. The side aisles are lit by small rectilinear tripartite windows. Eight simple lancet windows illuminate the chapel at the east end. The south transept and porch is lit by an extremely intricate quinpartite window of brick tracery, similar, though more elaborate, than the nave windows. The east and west ends of the Church are rather surprisingly not provided with monumental windows.

The exterior of the west end is by contrast decorated with a sculpture by Ivor Livi of Christ on the Cross attended by St John the Evangelist and St Mary Magdalene.

Internally the Church consists of a wide nave covered by a slightly pitched roof supported off large concrete beams that span across the nave from wall to wall. Surrounding the nave are two narrow side aisles on the north and south, which in turn lead to slightly larger transepts and ultimately to the chapel at the east end via a couple of ambulatories around the sanctuary. Leading off the north transept is the choir vestry and sacristry, which forms part of the Church Hall complex with its own series of ancillary buildings.