Church of England Diocese of Bath & Wells Goathurst

HELP FOR HERITAGE FOR ST EDWARD’S CHURCH, GOATHURST

17 Nov 2020, 4 p.m.
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HELP FOR HERITAGE AS ST EDWARD’S CHURCH, GOATHURST

RECEIVES LIFELINE FROM GOVERNMENT’S CULTURE RECOVERY FUND

● More help for heritage in need with £14 million investment in England’s historic sites

St Edward’s Church, Goathurst is among 162 organisations receiving lifeline grant from the £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund

● Culture across the country benefits as 70per cent of latest Culture Recovery funding awarded outside London

Lifeline grants from the latest round of the £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund will protect a further 162 heritage sites to ensure that jobs and access to arts, culture and heritage in local communities are protected in the months ahead, the Culture Secretary announced today.

Historic sites including St Edward’s Church,Goathurst will receive help to meet ongoing costs and support to restart activity when it is possible to do so safely.

More than £9 million has been allocated by the National Lottery Heritage Fund and Historic England on behalf of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which builds on £103 million awarded to more significant historic places last month. Grants between £10,000 and £1 million have been awarded to stabilise 77 organisations.

In addition, £5 million will go to construction and maintenance projects that have been paused due to the pandemic.

Historic England has allocated £3,971,513 in awards from the Heritage Stimulus Fund, part of a £120 million capital investment from the Culture Recovery Fund, to restart construction and maintenance projects facing delays or increased costs as a result of the pandemic and save specialist livelihoods in the sector.

St Edward’s Church has received a much-needed grant of £11,000 which will go towards the cost of replacing the roof of the north chapel. The church was moved onto the buildings at risk register after thieves stole lead from the chapel roof in December last year, leaving the widely acclaimed collection of 17th century tombs and monuments exposed to the elements. The monuments are from the Halswell-Kemeys-Tynte family and form an integral and important part of the history and heritage of Goathurst. A temporary roof covering has been in place since the theft. The grant will help pay towards a replacement terne-coated steel roof. 

Culture Secretary, Oliver Dowden, said:

“These grants will help the places that have shaped our skylines for hundreds of years and that continue to define culture in our towns and cities.

From St Paul’s and Ronnie Scott’s to The Lowry and Durham Cathedral, we’re protecting heritage and culture in every corner of the country to save jobs and ensure it can bounce back strongly.”

Church Warden, Brenda Smith, said: “We are delighted with, and truly grateful for, this grant from Historic England as we desperately need to ensure the north chapel is watertight to prevent further damage to the tombs and monuments housed therein. Prior to the lead theft, the PCC were already actively pursuing a conservation and restoration programme concerning these and other monuments and were devastated by the water ingress damage caused by these criminals-a situation compounded by the Covid-19 situation throughout 2020. This grant has enabled us to re-instate a permanent roof at the earliest opportunity which should be in place by the end of February next year.”

Parts of St Edward’s Church date back to the 14th century with the north chapel being added in the early 17th century to house the tombs and memorials to the Halswell-Kemeys-Tynte family who were holders of the manor of Halswell (Goathurst was the estate village). Consequently, this heritage is closely intertwined with nearby Halswell House and Park which are also currently undergoing extensive restoration. Working collaboratively, the church, Halswell House and Park and the Landmark Trust have devised a unique Village Heritage Trail which was successfully launched as part of the Heritage Open Days in September 2019, welcoming over 400 visitors from far and wide. We hope to repeat this in 2021 as well as providing opportunities for specific guided tours.

When the current restrictions are lifted, the church will once again be open daily for visitors to explore this history and heritage as part of the church’s long term vision to maximise these assets as an integral part of mission and outreach to the wider community.

74 organisations are also receiving grants of up to £25,000 from the Covid-19 Emergency Heritage at Risk Response Fund, launched by Historic England and almost quadrupled thanks to the Culture Recovery Fund, to cover maintenance and repairs urgently needed on historic buildings and sites up and down the country.

Ros Kerslake, Chief Executive of the National Lottery Heritage Fund said:

              “The Government’s £1.57bn package for culture is unprecedented and it’s important to acknowledge how valuable this                has been for our heritage organisations and visitor attractions. Although we are not able to support everyone facing                    difficulties, today’s funding package helps a diverse range of heritage organisations from across the country survive,                     adapt and plan for a brighter future through the Culture Recovery Fund for Heritage.

             “By the end of this financial year we will have distributed almost £600m of Government and National Lottery Funding                  to heritage organisations. Investing in heritage remains vitally important, creating jobs and economic prosperity,                          driving tourism, supporting our wellbeing and making our towns, cities, and rural areas better places to live. There is a                lot more work to do to address the ongoing challenges, but this funding has provided a future for much of our                             heritage and the organisations that care for it, when it might otherwise have been permanently lost.”

All four nations are benefiting from the UK Government’s £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund, with £188 million barnetted to the Devolved Administrations to run their own process - £97 million for Scotland, £59 million for Wales and £33 million for Northern Ireland. This funding will enable them to increase the support already available to the arts and cultural sectors in each nation.

Over £18 million in funding will go to 8 arts and cultural organisations around the country in the second round of grants between £1 million and £3 million awarded by Arts Council England on behalf of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, it has also been announced today. This funding builds on £75 million in grants over £1 million for iconic venues like Shakespeare’s Globe and the Sheffield Crucible last month.

A full list of organisations receiving funding is available from Historic England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Church Warden, Brenda Smith, said: “We are delighted with, and truly grateful for, this grant from Historic England as we desperately need to ensure the north chapel is watertight to prevent further damage to the tombs and monuments housed inside.

“Prior to the lead theft, the PCC were already actively pursuing a conservation and restoration programme concerning these and other monuments and were devastated by the water damage caused by the theft. The situation has also been compounded by the Covid-19 situation throughout 2020 restricting work being carried out on the building.

“This grant will enable us to re-instate a permanent roof at the earliest opportunity. We are hoping it will be in place by the end of February 2021.”

Parts of St Edward’s Church date back to the 14th century with the north chapel being added in the early 17th  century to house the tombs and memorials to the Halswell-Kemeys-Tynte family who were holders of the manor of Halswell (Goathurst was the estate village). Consequently, this heritage is closely intertwined with nearby Halswell House and Park which are also currently undergoing extensive restoration.

Working collaboratively, the church, Halswell House and Park, together with the Landmark Trust have devised a unique Village Heritage Trail which was successfully launched as part of the Heritage Open Days in September 2019, welcoming over 400 visitors from far and wide. We hope to repeat this in 2021 as well as providing opportunities for specific guided tours.

When the current Covid-19 restrictions are lifted, the church will once again be open daily for visitors to explore this history and heritage as part of the church’s long term vision to maximise these assets as an integral part of mission and outreach to the wider community.

74 organisations are also receiving grants of up to £25,000 from the Covid-19 Emergency Heritage at Risk Response Fund, launched by Historic England and almost quadrupled thanks to the Culture Recovery Fund, to cover maintenance and repairs urgently needed on historic buildings and sites up and down the country.

Duncan Wilson, Historic England Chief Executive said:

“Historic places across the country, from Durham Cathedral embodying more than a thousand years of history to the Crystal Palace dinosaurs, much loved by children and grownups alike, are being supported by the Government’s latest round of grants awarded under the Culture Recovery Fund. This funding is a lifeline which is kickstarting essential repairs and maintenance at many of our most precious historic sites, so they can begin to recover from the damaging effects of Covid-19. It is also providing employment for skilled craft workers who help to keep historic places alive