Church of England Diocese of Truro Phillack with Gwithian

About Us

Welcome to the parish church of Gwithian: St Gothians in the Anglican Diocese of Truro and county of Cornwall England.  St Gothians is one of the five churches which is encompassed within the Godrevy Team Ministry.  Visit The Godrevy Team Ministry web site using the 'Get in touch' link in the sidebar.

Gwithian Church serves a population of approximately 1,800 encompassing the villages of Gwithian and Connor Downs; it is a busy church, well used for weddings and baptisms.  Whilst our own churchmanship is of a liberal ‘catholic’ tradition, the congregation is able to and does enjoy other formats of Worship within the Team.

The congregation of Gwithian church considers its mission to be the spreading of the word through services, supporting individuals and raising the profile of the church by participating in community events.  The congregation strive to keep the local and more distant population fully aware of services, events, and fellowship gatherings.  We promote the use of the church for private prayer and quiet contemplation during the long hours of accessibility during the day.  Gwithian is known for its friendly and welcoming attitude, and during the Summer months its congregation numbers are swelled by visitors and holiday makers.

The Church of St Gothian stands on an ancient site, the original Norman building had a chancel arch and two similar arches spanning the junctions of transepts and nave.  These arches were built with sandstone or sandrock, an easliy worked rock obtained from the nearby cliffs at Godrevy.

In the 15 c the church was enlarged with the addition of a south aisle and a fine west tower, battlemented, with light pinnacles and angels at the upper angles.  It is a particularly good example of the skilled use of the local granite.

By the 19 c, an almost complete reconstruction was essential, and between 1865-1867 the entire south aisle was removed to reinstate the original cruciform plan.  Only the tower of the 15 c building remained and the fine original tower arch.  The altar, of oak, has a beautiful crimson frontal embroidered by members of the family of the then rector, the Revd. Hockin, who bore the whole cost of this restoration including the building of an adjoining schoolroom; now the Church Hall.  Two granite arches saved from the 15 c arcade have been built into the lychgate.

The square bowl of the font is all that is left of the Norman church.  It's date is circa 1150.

Visit the Gwithian-Gwinear Parish Council website for more information about the community of Gwithian: www.ggpc.org.uk