Church of England Diocese of Bath & Wells High Ham with Low Ham

Facilities and features

Click on the tags below to learn more about each.

Accessibility

There is Car Parking space in front of the church.

Accessible car parking

There is a portable ramp which gives ease of access through the main door. Please contact Philip Morlock Churchwarden 01458 250285 or Mike Tottle 252237 if you are planning to visit who do their best to make sure the ramp is in place for you.r you.

Hearing (induction) Loop
Large Print
Assistance Dogs

The incumbent and volunteers from the village are active with the Langport Dementia Action Alliance and welcome those living with Dementia.


Our Building

“The church faces broadside on a pretty village green, not a common thing in Somerset” (Pevsner) in the heart of the village, the present church of St Andrew dates from 1476, when it was built to replace the earlier Norman foundation, itself a successor to the original 10th century church. Until the Reformation, it was controlled by the great Abbey of Glastonbury; today it forms part of a benefice comprising High Ham, Huish Episcopi and Aller. It is listed as a Grade I by English Heritage.

The exterior is dominated by the tower, whose lower part dates from the 14th century, while the outside walls of both nave and aisles are topped by battlements, with some of Somerset's quirkiest and most outstanding hunkypunks (local idiom for gargoyles) draining the roof.

Once through the porch, with its medieval statue of St Andrew and his saltire above the door, you'll find a church suffused with light, where the eye is immediately drawn to the rood screen dividing the nave from the chancel. Elegant and exuberant, this wooden structure, completed in 1499, is St Andrew's greatest treasure.

The oldest liturigical piece in the church is the Norman font, dating from around 1120, and the nave is overlooked by a positive troupe of carved angels. There are six bells; these are rung regularly.

The exterior is dominated by the tower, whose lower part dates from the 14th century, while the outside walls of both nave and aisles are topped by battlements, with some of Somerset's quirkiest and most outstanding hunkypunks (local idiom for gargoyles) draining the roof.

The 2016 Quinquennial Report offers a brief description and Historical Summary
6.1 St Andrew’s Church comprises four cells of a three bay chancel, four bay nave and north and south aisle with west tower and south porch.
6.2 Built in lias with Ham and Bath ashlar dressings under slate roofs to the nave and lead to aisles and porch all behind tall battlemented parapets.
The nave has clerestory lights above the tall aisles.
6.3 The tower has traces of 12th and 14th century work but the main parts of the church were mostly rebuilt in 1476. There is some 19th century reordering by John Norton.
6.4 The chancel has a very fine moulded king post roof with arch braced ties and decorated with generous carving.
6.5 Furniture and fittings include much medieval work in choir stalls, many bench ends and the fan vaulted rood screen.


Music and Worship

High Ham is proud to maintain a keen band of local bellringers, ably led by Tower Captain John Vigar, who ring at services and have regular practices on Wednesday evening. These faithful volunteers also ring at St Mary's, Huish Episcopi and St Andrew's Aller within the Benefice, but also enjoy ringing with St Michael's Somerton too.

If you would like to learn to ring, or attend a practice or know more about the bells please do contact John Vigar (Tower Captain) on 01458 250536

On Sunday 31st January, 2016, a special service of prayer, dedication and blessing with Holy Communion was held to give thanks and seek blessing for the newly hung sixth bell in the tower here at St Andrew’s. High Ham. This sixth bell came as generous gift from Bob Parker, who physically did the work, funding the bell with support from Joy Vigar, the Lavis Family and High Ham with Low Ham PCC.
And grateful thanks expressed to all our faithful bellringing band, who serve unseen – but not unheard –
week by week in bell towers near you across our Benefice.

Our grateful thanks go to Bob Parker, Joy Vigar, The Lavis family
and High Ham with Low Ham PCC

and, of course, to all our faithful bellringing band,
who serve unseen – but not unheard –
week by week in bell towers near you across our Benefice
A s

On the first Sunday of the month we celebrate 0800 Holy Communion following the BCP Collects and Epistles.
On the fourth Sunday of the month we hold a 1730 Sung Evensong, BCP Evening Prayer


Groups, Courses and Activities


Help for Visitors

The church is open from 0800 until 1700 each day.
If you would like access to the church at other times please contact the keyholder Mike Tottle on 01458 252237


Other Features

Items for the local Food Bank are collected in the church for distribution by a satellite branch of Taunton Food Bank (Trussell Trust) which is open for those in need at The Ridgway Hall in Langport on Wednesday afternoons 2.30-4.00pm